How to sort ps command output | Wenhan Code life

How to sort ps command output

ps command has a --sort option which can help you to sort processes.

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--sort spec
Specify sorting order. Sorting syntax is
[+|-]key[,[+|-]key[,...]]. Choose a multi-letter key from the
STANDARD FORMAT SPECIFIERS section. The "+" is optional since
default direction is increasing numerical or lexicographic
order. Identical to k. For example: ps jax --sort=uid,-ppid,
+pid

Sort ps output by memory

From high to low

The highest is at the top of the command

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# ps aux --sort -rss

From low to high

The highest is at the bottom of the command

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# ps aux --sort rss

Sort ps output by cpu usage

From high to low

The highest is at the top of the command

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# ps aux --sort -pcpu

From low to high

The highest is at the bottom of the command

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# ps aux --sort rss

other sorting specifiers

Check the man page of ps command.

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STANDARD FORMAT SPECIFIERS
Here are the different keywords that may be used to control the output format (e.g.
with option -o) or to sort the selected processes with the GNU-style --sort option.

For example: ps -eo pid,user,args --sort user

This version of ps tries to recognize most of the keywords used in other
implementations of ps.

The following user-defined format specifiers may contain spaces:
args, cmd, comm, command, fname, ucmd, ucomm, lstart, bsdstart, start.

Some keywords may not be available for sorting.


CODE HEADER DESCRIPTION

%cpu %CPU cpu utilization of the process in "##.#" format. Currently,
it is the CPU time used divided by the time the process has
been running (cputime/realtime ratio), expressed as a
percentage. It will not add up to 100% unless you are lucky.
(alias pcpu).

%mem %MEM ratio of the process's resident set size to the physical
memory on the machine, expressed as a percentage. (alias
pmem).

args COMMAND command with all its arguments as a string. Modifications to
the arguments may be shown. The output in this column may
contain spaces. A process marked <defunct> is partly dead,
waiting to be fully destroyed by its parent. Sometimes the
process args will be unavailable; when this happens, ps will
instead print the executable name in brackets. (alias
cmd, command). See also the comm format keyword, the -f
option, and the c option.
When specified last, this column will extend to the edge of
the display. If ps can not determine display width, as when
output is redirected (piped) into a file or another command,
the output width is undefined (it may be 80, unlimited,
determined by the TERM variable, and so on). The COLUMNS
environment variable or --cols option may be used to exactly
determine the width in this case. The w or -w option may be
also be used to adjust width.

blocked BLOCKED mask of the blocked signals, see signal(7). According to the
width of the field, a 32 or 64-bit mask in hexadecimal format
is displayed. (alias sig_block, sigmask).

bsdstart START time the command started. If the process was started less
than 24 hours ago, the output format is " HH:MM", else it is "
Mmm:SS" (where Mmm is the three letters of the month). See
also lstart, start, start_time, and stime.

bsdtime TIME accumulated cpu time, user + system. The display format is
usually "MMM:SS", but can be shifted to the right if the
process used more than 999 minutes of cpu time.



c C processor utilization. Currently, this is the integer value of
the percent usage over the lifetime of the process. (see
%cpu).

caught CAUGHT mask of the caught signals, see signal(7). According to the
width of the field, a 32 or 64 bits mask in hexadecimal format
is displayed. (alias sig_catch, sigcatch).

cgroup CGROUP display control groups to which the process belongs.

class CLS scheduling class of the process. (alias policy, cls).
Field's possible values are:

- not reported
TS SCHED_OTHER
FF SCHED_FIFO
RR SCHED_RR
B SCHED_BATCH
ISO SCHED_ISO
IDL SCHED_IDLE
? unknown value

cls CLS scheduling class of the process. (alias policy, cls).
Field's possible values are:

- not reported
TS SCHED_OTHER
FF SCHED_FIFO
RR SCHED_RR
B SCHED_BATCH
ISO SCHED_ISO
IDL SCHED_IDLE
? unknown value

cmd CMD see args. (alias args, command).

comm COMMAND command name (only the executable name). Modifications to the
command name will not be shown. A process marked <defunct> is
partly dead, waiting to be fully destroyed by its parent. The
output in this column may contain spaces. (alias
ucmd, ucomm). See also the args format keyword, the -f
option, and the c option.
When specified last, this column will extend to the edge of
the display. If ps can not determine display width, as when
output is redirected (piped) into a file or another command,
the output width is undefined (it may be 80, unlimited,
determined by the TERM variable, and so on). The COLUMNS
environment variable or --cols option may be used to exactly
determine the width in this case. The w or -w option may be
also be used to adjust width.

command COMMAND See args. (alias args, command).

cp CP per-mill (tenths of a percent) CPU usage. (see %cpu).

cputime TIME cumulative CPU time, "[DD-]hh:mm:ss" format. (alias time).

drs DRS data resident set size, the amount of physical memory devoted
to other than executable code.

egid EGID effective group ID number of the process as a decimal integer.
(alias gid).

egroup EGROUP effective group ID of the process. This will be the textual
group ID, if it can be obtained and the field width permits,
or a decimal representation otherwise. (alias group).

eip EIP instruction pointer.

esp ESP stack pointer.


etime ELAPSED elapsed time since the process was started, in the form
[[DD-]hh:]mm:ss.

etimes ELAPSED elapsed time since the process was started, in seconds.

euid EUID effective user ID (alias uid).

euser EUSER effective user name. This will be the textual user ID, if it
can be obtained and the field width permits, or a decimal
representation otherwise. The n option can be used to force
the decimal representation. (alias uname, user).

f F flags associated with the process, see the PROCESS FLAGS
section. (alias flag, flags).

fgid FGID filesystem access group ID. (alias fsgid).

fgroup FGROUP filesystem access group ID. This will be the textual group
ID, if it can be obtained and the field width permits, or a
decimal representation otherwise. (alias fsgroup).

flag F see f. (alias f, flags).

flags F see f. (alias f, flag).

fname COMMAND first 8 bytes of the base name of the process's executable
file. The output in this column may contain spaces.

fuid FUID filesystem access user ID. (alias fsuid).

fuser FUSER filesystem access user ID. This will be the textual user ID,
if it can be obtained and the field width permits, or a
decimal representation otherwise.

gid GID see egid. (alias egid).

group GROUP see egroup. (alias egroup).

ignored IGNORED mask of the ignored signals, see signal(7). According to the
width of the field, a 32 or 64 bits mask in hexadecimal format
is displayed. (alias sig_ignore, sigignore).

ipcns IPCNS Unique inode number describing the namespace the process
belongs to. See namespaces(7).

label LABEL security label, most commonly used for SELinux context data.
This is for the Mandatory Access Control ("MAC") found on
high-security systems.

lstart STARTED time the command started. See also
bsdstart, start, start_time, and stime.

lsession SESSION displays the login session identifier of a process, if systemd
support has been included.

lwp LWP light weight process (thread) ID of the dispatchable entity
(alias spid, tid). See tid for additional information.

machine MACHINE displays the machine name for processes assigned to VM or
container, if systemd support has been included.

maj_flt MAJFLT The number of major page faults that have occurred with this
process.

min_flt MINFLT The number of minor page faults that have occurred with this
process.

mntns MNTNS Unique inode number describing the namespace the process
belongs to. See namespaces(7).


netns NETNS Unique inode number describing the namespace the process
belongs to. See namespaces(7).

ni NI nice value. This ranges from 19 (nicest) to -20 (not nice to
others), see nice(1). (alias nice).

nice NI see ni.(alias ni).

nlwp NLWP number of lwps (threads) in the process. (alias thcount).

nwchan WCHAN address of the kernel function where the process is sleeping
(use wchan if you want the kernel function name). Running
tasks will display a dash ('-') in this column.

ouid OWNER displays the Unix user identifier of the owner of the session
of a process, if systemd support has been included.

pcpu %CPU see %cpu. (alias %cpu).

pending PENDING mask of the pending signals. See signal(7). Signals pending
on the process are distinct from signals pending on individual
threads. Use the m option or the -m option to see both.
According to the width of the field, a 32 or 64 bits mask in
hexadecimal format is displayed. (alias sig).

pgid PGID process group ID or, equivalently, the process ID of the
process group leader. (alias pgrp).

pgrp PGRP see pgid. (alias pgid).

pid PID a number representing the process ID (alias tgid).

pidns PIDNS Unique inode number describing the namespace the process
belongs to. See namespaces(7).

pmem %MEM see %mem. (alias %mem).

policy POL scheduling class of the process. (alias class, cls).
Possible values are:

- not reported
TS SCHED_OTHER
FF SCHED_FIFO
RR SCHED_RR
B SCHED_BATCH
ISO SCHED_ISO
IDL SCHED_IDLE
? unknown value

ppid PPID parent process ID.

pri PRI priority of the process. Higher number means lower priority.

psr PSR processor that process is currently assigned to.

rgid RGID real group ID.

rgroup RGROUP real group name. This will be the textual group ID, if it can
be obtained and the field width permits, or a decimal
representation otherwise.

rss RSS resident set size, the non-swapped physical memory that a task
has used (in kiloBytes). (alias rssize, rsz).

rssize RSS see rss. (alias rss, rsz).

rsz RSZ see rss. (alias rss, rssize).

rtprio RTPRIO realtime priority.


ruid RUID real user ID.

ruser RUSER real user ID. This will be the textual user ID, if it can be
obtained and the field width permits, or a decimal
representation otherwise.

s S minimal state display (one character). See section PROCESS
STATE CODES for the different values. See also stat if you
want additional information displayed. (alias state).

sched SCH scheduling policy of the process. The policies SCHED_OTHER
(SCHED_NORMAL), SCHED_FIFO, SCHED_RR, SCHED_BATCH, SCHED_ISO,
and SCHED_IDLE are respectively displayed as 0, 1, 2, 3, 4,
and 5.

seat SEAT displays the identifier associated with all hardware devices
assigned to a specific workplace, if systemd support has been
included.

sess SESS session ID or, equivalently, the process ID of the session
leader. (alias session, sid).

sgi_p P processor that the process is currently executing on.
Displays "*" if the process is not currently running or
runnable.

sgid SGID saved group ID. (alias svgid).

sgroup SGROUP saved group name. This will be the textual group ID, if it
can be obtained and the field width permits, or a decimal
representation otherwise.

sid SID see sess. (alias sess, session).

sig PENDING see pending. (alias pending, sig_pend).

sigcatch CAUGHT see caught. (alias caught, sig_catch).

sigignore IGNORED see ignored. (alias ignored, sig_ignore).

sigmask BLOCKED see blocked. (alias blocked, sig_block).

size SIZE approximate amount of swap space that would be required if the
process were to dirty all writable pages and then be swapped
out. This number is very rough!

slice SLICE displays the slice unit which a process belongs to, if systemd
support has been included.

spid SPID see lwp. (alias lwp, tid).

stackp STACKP address of the bottom (start) of stack for the process.

start STARTED time the command started. If the process was started less
than 24 hours ago, the output format is "HH:MM:SS", else it is
" Mmm dd" (where Mmm is a three-letter month name). See also
lstart, bsdstart, start_time, and stime.

start_time START starting time or date of the process. Only the year will be
displayed if the process was not started the same year ps was
invoked, or "MmmDD" if it was not started the same day, or
"HH:MM" otherwise. See also bsdstart, start, lstart,
and stime.

stat STAT multi-character process state. See section PROCESS STATE
CODES for the different values meaning. See also s and state
if you just want the first character displayed.

state S see s. (alias s).


suid SUID saved user ID. (alias svuid).

supgid SUPGID group ids of supplementary groups, if any. See getgroups(2).

supgrp SUPGRP group names of supplementary groups, if any. See
getgroups(2).

suser SUSER saved user name. This will be the textual user ID, if it can
be obtained and the field width permits, or a decimal
representation otherwise. (alias svuser).

svgid SVGID see sgid. (alias sgid).

svuid SVUID see suid. (alias suid).

sz SZ size in physical pages of the core image of the process. This
includes text, data, and stack space. Device mappings are
currently excluded; this is subject to change. See
vsz and rss.

tgid TGID a number representing the thread group to which a task belongs
(alias pid). It is the process ID of the thread group leader.

thcgr THCGR display control groups to which the thread belongs.

thcount THCNT see nlwp. (alias nlwp). number of kernel threads owned by
the process.

tid TID the unique number representing a dispatchable entity (alias
lwp, spid). This value may also appear as: a process ID
(pid); a process group ID (pgrp); a session ID for the session
leader (sid); a thread group ID for the thread group leader
(tgid); and a tty process group ID for the process group
leader (tpgid).

time TIME cumulative CPU time, "[DD-]HH:MM:SS" format. (alias cputime).

tname TTY controlling tty (terminal). (alias tt, tty).

tpgid TPGID ID of the foreground process group on the tty (terminal) that
the process is connected to, or -1 if the process is not
connected to a tty.

trs TRS text resident set size, the amount of physical memory devoted
to executable code.

tt TT controlling tty (terminal). (alias tname, tty).

tty TT controlling tty (terminal). (alias tname, tt).

ucmd CMD see comm. (alias comm, ucomm).

ucomm COMMAND see comm. (alias comm, ucmd).

uid UID see euid. (alias euid).

uname USER see euser. (alias euser, user).

unit UNIT displays unit which a process belongs to, if systemd support
has been included.

user USER see euser. (alias euser, uname).

userns USERNS Unique inode number describing the namespace the process
belongs to. See namespaces(7).

utsns UTSNS Unique inode number describing the namespace the process
belongs to. See namespaces(7).


uunit UUNIT displays user unit which a process belongs to, if systemd
support has been included.

vsize VSZ see vsz. (alias vsz).

vsz VSZ virtual memory size of the process in KiB (1024-byte units).
Device mappings are currently excluded; this is subject to
change. (alias vsize).

wchan WCHAN name of the kernel function in which the process is sleeping,
a "-" if the process is running, or a "*" if the process is
multi-threaded and ps is not displaying threads.